Education

What is Leadership Style in Management?

What is a Leadership Style? – A leader’s leadership style applies to how he or she gives orders, executes strategies, and motivates others. Several scholars have suggested that leaders in politics, industry, and other fields demonstrate a variety of leadership types.

In the military, research on leadership style are undertaken, expressing an ideology that emphasizes a systemic understanding of leadership, and how a leader’s outward appearance influences how people experience him or her. Military bearing, physical health, trust, and endurance are all aspects of physical appearance in this sense.

The analytical potential of the leader assists in the conceptualization of ideas and the development of required skills for the job. Agility, judgement, ingenuity, behavioural tact, and domain experience are also examples of a leader’s conceptual skills. Tactical and technological expertise, as well as cultural and strategic understanding, are all part of domain knowledge.

Types of Leadership Style in Management

Great leaders have evolved throughout history with distinct leadership models for offering guidance, executing strategies, and inspiring people. It can be classified into 8 categories:

  1. Autocratic Leadership
  2. Strategic Leadership
  3. Transformational Leadership
  4. Democratic Leadership
  5. Laissez-Faire Leadership
  6. Transactional Leadership
  7. Bureaucratic Leadership
  8. Coach-Style Leadership

Autocratic Leadership

Democratic leadership ensures that the chief takes decisions based on the input of all members of the team. Each employee has a fair say in the course of a project, even though he or she makes the final decision.

Democratic leadership is one of the most powerful forms of leadership because it encourages lower-level workers to wield power that they will require in future jobs. It’s quite similar to how decisions are taken in corporate boardrooms.

Strategic Leadership

Strategic leaders sit at the crossroads between a company’s core activities and its potential for expansion. He or she embraces the responsibility of executive interests while ensuring that everyone else’s working conditions remain secure.

Strategic thought embraces many groups of workers at the same time, making this a desirable leadership approach in many businesses. Leaders who behave in this manner, on the other hand, can set a risky example in terms of how many people they will serve at once and what the best course of action for the business is if everyone gets their way all of the time.

Transformational Leadership

The conventions of the organization are constantly being “transformed” and improved by transformational leadership. Employees may have a simple set of assignments and goals to achieve each week or month, but the boss is continually moving them outside of their comfort zones.

When beginning a job under this sort of boss, all workers will be given a list of objectives to meet, as well as deadlines to meet them. Although the goals will seem easy at first, as you advance through the business, this boss will accelerate the speed of deadlines or allocate you more complicated targets.

Democratic Leadership

Democratic leadership ensures that the chief takes decisions based on the input of all members of the team. Each employee has a fair say in the course of a project, even though he or she makes the final decision.

Democratic leadership is one of the most powerful forms of leadership because it encourages lower-level workers to wield power that they will require in future jobs. It’s quite similar to how decisions are taken in corporate boardrooms.

Laissez-Faire Leadership

If you recall your high school French, you’ll know that laissez-faire leadership is the least invasive style of leadership. Leaders who follow the French word “laissez-faire” simply mean “let them do,” and they delegate virtually all power to their workers.

You may see a laissez-faire business founder in a new startup, for example, that makes no big office rules about operating hours or deadlines. They can place complete confidence in their employees while concentrating on the day-to-day operations of the business.

Transactional Leadership

In today’s world, transactional leaders are fairly popular. These bosses award their workers salaries depending on the job they perform. A typical example of transactional leadership is a marketing staff that earns a quarterly incentive for assisting in the generation of a certain amount of leads by the end of the year.

When you first start working for a transactional manager, you might be given a reward package to encourage you to easily learn your daily job responsibilities. If you work in marketing, for example, you could get a bonus for sending 10 marketing emails. A transformational boss, on the other hand, could only give you a bonus if your job results in a significant number of newsletter subscriptions.

What is Leadership Style in Management?

Bureaucratic Leadership

Members of the bureaucracy follow the rules. Unlike autocratic leadership, this type of leadership can listen to and accept employee feedback, but the leader is more likely to ignore employee input if it contradicts company policies or past practices.


Employees do not feel as dominated as they may under autocratic administration, but there is always a limit on how many employees will do with their employment. This can easily stifle creativity, which is not a good thing for businesses aiming for big ambitions and fast expansion.

Coach-Style Leadership

This chief, like the coach of a sports team, is concerned with understanding and cultivating the individual talents of each member of his or her team. They also concentrate on tactics that can help their staff work together more effectively. This leadership model is similar to strategic and democratic leadership, but it emphasizes primarily individual employee development and performance.


Rather than requiring all staff to rely on the same abilities and priorities, this leader might form a team in which each individual has a particular experience or ability set. In the long term, this chief is concerned with developing solid teams that can collaborate successfully and respect each other’s special abilities.

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