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How to Track Oxygen Level Through Mobile Free?

Heart rate monitors, which utilise the microphone or, in some cases, the camera to detect your heart rate, are available on both the iPhone app store and the Android market, with varied degrees of accuracy. A Worcester Polytechnic Institute researcher wanted to take this concept a step further, so he created a smartphone app that uses the phone’s built-in video camera to monitor not just heart rate, but also heart rhythm, respiratory rate, and blood oxygen saturation.

Even while the total number of infections in India continues to decline, the COVID-19 epidemic is far from ended. Many specialists and politicians have expressed concern about the pandemic’s third wave, and residents are panic-buying medical equipment to safeguard the safety of their loved ones.

An oximeter, which monitors the amount of oxygen in the blood, is one of the most important tools for checking the condition of positive patients (Spo2). A COVID-19 positive patient must typically maintain a SpO2 level over 95%, and anything lower that needs immediate medical intervention.

How to Track Oxygen Level Through Mobile Free?

Meanwhile, CareNow Healthcare, a Kolkata-based health-tech business, has created CarePlix Vitals, a smartphone app that allows users to check vitals like as heart rate and SpO2 by placing the index finger on the phone’s back flashlight.

The app promises to employ the same concepts as photoplethysmography, or PPG, which uses a light source to detect volumetric fluctuations in blood circulation. In this scenario, instead of using infrared light in an oximeter, the app makes use of the phone’s backlight.

The CarePlix Vitals App is now available for free download on Google Play and the Apple App Store. Users must register using their email addresses. The software collects users’ contact information and uses statistics, according to the Apple App Store privacy chart. Users may store scans from each test and utilize them later using the ‘vitals analytics’ feature.

During our testing, we matched the app’s results to those of two different oximeters obtained from a nearby medical supply store. During each test, the app provided reasonably accurate findings. Overall, the app may be useful for users who are unable to obtain an oximeter owing to a lack of availability or a rise in the price of the device as a result of the COVID-19 epidemic.

Users may also look at these SpO2-enabled fitness bands and smartwatches, which come with a variety of health-related sensors and additional free blood oxygen monitoring applications like Pulse Monitor – Beat & Oxygen Blood Oxygen and Blood Oxygen.

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