Deploying the Work Breakdown Structure

What is Work Breakdown Structure?

A work breakdown structure (WBS) is a deliverable oriented hierarchal arrangement of tasks that organises the full scope of the project for easy visualisation. This makes it easier to see what needs to be done and how much work you will need to complete to meet the desired final goal.

The WBS can be used at any project stage, from the initial planning and brainstorming to post-completion analysis. A WBS will help plan and prioritise the work needed to complete a project.

The progress of a software project relies on a successful work breakdown arrangement and its compatibility with the method system. Although the principle and practice of using a WBS are well known, the published literature largely avoids this subject.

This is because the development of a job breakdown system is influenced by project management style, corporate philosophy, client preferences, financial limitations, and a variety of other difficult-to-define project-specific criteria. Context information on machine-oriented job breakdown systems can be found in Software Engineering Economics [Boehm, 1981].

A Work Breakdown Structure is simply a hierarchy of elements that decomposes the project plan into discrete work tasks. Below are the following points for Significant Work is:

Product subsystems, modules, functions, organisational units, life-cycle periods, and even geographies may affect the decomposition of work into discrete tasks. The majority of structures have a subsystem-level decomposition. Subsystems are then broken down into their constituent parts, one of which is usually the software. This section focuses on software WBS components if the program is the whole project or only one part of a broader scheme.

The organisational map of a job breakdown system details all of a project’s phases, making it an important project management method for organising and scheduling. The final deliverable sits above the map, while the stages below it separate the project scope by indicating the steps, deliverables, and activities required to achieve it.

Project managers use project management tools to plan and perform a task breakdown structure. Project management tools can be handy for organising, arranging, and executing tasks combined with a Gantt map that implements WBS hierarchies.

Levels in a Work Break Down Structure

In project management, a work breakdown structure (WBS) breaks down big, complicated tasks into smaller, more manageable chunks to make them easy to prepare, schedule, and execute. Tiers of project deliverables and tasks are developed to aid in preparing, implementing, and monitoring projects. There are four main levels of a WBS, which are outlined below:

Types of Work Break Down Structure

There are two types of job breakdown structures: deliverable-based and phase-based. A deliverable-based WBS defines the project’s deliverables and scale. At the same time, a phase-based WBS shows the final deliverable on top, with the five stages of a project shown below (initiation, planning, execution, control, and closeout).


Clearly, a work breakup structure is a versatile instrument. A plain numbered list (also known as an outline view), a straightforward tree diagram, or even a Gantt map may all be used. When a Gantt map is part of a broader project management tool, the Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) can be used to schedule, delegate, report, and document the team’s progress.

Some Common types of Work Breakdown Structure are:

Verb-oriented WBS: It defines the deliverables in terms of actions.

Noun-oriented WBS: It defines work in terms of components

Time-phased WBS: It breaks the project into phases for long-term projects.

Why use Work Breakdown Structure?

The first step in creating a project plan is to create a work breakdown structure (WBS). It sets out all of the activities that must be completed (and in what order) to fulfil the project’s priorities and objectives. You and your resources will work on identifying mission-critical projects, their subtasks, and the interdependencies between them by visualising the project in this way.

Cost analysis, resource utilisation, and risk evaluation are critical project management processes that benefit from a well-designed WBS. A WBS also aids in the avoidance of typical project problems such as missing deadlines, complexity creep, and cost overrun, to name a few.

In other words, a work breakdown system acts as a road chart for completing difficult tasks. A project can be broken down into stages or smaller sub-projects, and such sub-projects can be broken down into deliverables, sub-deliverables, and task sets! As a result, you’ll have a better understanding of the information required to complete any part of your project.

How to create Work Break Down Structure?

A job breakdown framework can be generated in five stages. These are the big steps in a WBS, the bird’s-eye view that finally leads to the granular stage. However, understanding the key components and what is necessary to create a robust WBS is helpful. Some of the important things to keep in mind while creating a Work Break Down Structure are:

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